A blue chip by any other name

When it comes to mutual fund marketing, the glass is never half empty: It’s always full. This is why we don’t see funds with names like “The Occasional Outperformance Growth Fund” or “The Somewhat Erratic Income Fund.”

We do, however, have several funds with the words “blue chip” in them. Unfortunately, they may not have the blue-chip attributes you’re looking for.

First of all: What’s a blue-chip stock? The term “blue chip” comes from poker, where blue chips are traditionally the most valuable. “I think of it as a large-cap company that has been around for decades, pays an attractive yield and has an above-average record of raising earnings and dividends for an extended period of time,” said Sam Stovall, chief investment strategist of U.S. Equity Strategy at CFRA. It’s a fairly exalted status that few stocks earn, and fewer keep.  They’re the kind of stocks you’d imagine Uncle Pennybags from Monopoly would buy.

The term “blue chip” has become so popular that there are 15 stock funds with “blue chip” in the Morningstar database. Elizabeth Laprade, research analyst at  Adviser Investments, notes that three of the largest blue-chip funds – T. Rowe Price Blue Chip Growth ($54 billion), Fidelity Blue Chip Growth ($25 billion) and John Hancock Blue Chip Growth ($3 billion) – have between 122 and 429 stocks.

Whether there are 429 or even 122 blue-chip stocks is debatable, at best, and all three funds seem to stretch the definition. T. Rowe Price Blue Chip Growth, for example, has stakes in true blue-chip companies like Boeing and JPMorgan Chase. But its third-largest holding is Tencent Holdings, the Chinese internet advertising company. It also had stakes in Tesla, Monster Beverage and Norwegian Cruise Lines, which are probably not blue-chip companies, at least by Mr. Stovall’s definition.  All three funds own Alibaba.

Distressingly, all three funds have more volatility than the Standard & Poor’s 500 and lower dividend yields, too. This may be because all three are growth funds, and growth stocks often sneer at the notion of dividends. It may also be because of the funds’ expense ratios, which range from -0.78% for the John Hancock fund and O.69% for the Fidelity offering. Those aren’t excessive by large-company growth fund standards, but they do take a bite out of the funds’ dividend payouts.

Even worse is the funds’ maximum drawdown – the most the funds lost from peak to trough during downturns in the past five years. Here again, they didn’t beat the S&P 500, Ms. Laprade notes. “People need to be careful,” she said. “If they’re looking for blue-chip stocks, that may not be the case.”

 

Cash is never trash

For nearly a year now, pundits have been describing the U.S. stock market as “the least dirty shirt in the closet,” “the least bad-looking market,” “squeakier than a bowl of mice.” Ok, they didn’t use the last one. But the general implication is stocks may be expensive, but hey — they’re not bonds and they sure aren’t cash.

cashYou may have noticed, however, that cash looks increasingly attractive this week. While you’re earning an average 0.02% a year on your money market fund, that’s generally better than losing 1% to 2% a day on your stock fund.

Think of it this way: The average large-company blend stock fund is down 4.26% the past month. If you had 30% of your portfolio in cash, and 70% in your basic large-company stock fund, you’d be down 2.98%. While no loss is good, smaller losses are always better than larger ones.

More importantly, you would have an easily accessible buying reserve for stocks that seem ridiculously cheap. Finding values is more than buying whatever’s on the new low list. But if you can find a good stock that’s selling at a 20% discount or more, then this is a good time to think about buying.

Just recently I posted a list of companies in the Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index that are selling for 20% or more below their 52-week highs. That list has only grown since then. As of yesterday, 141 stocks, or 28% of the S&P 500, were below their 52-week highs. Among the more interesting entries to the 20% discount club:

  • Asset managers. Franklin Resources is down nearly 30% from its 52-week high, and it has now been joined by Legg Mason and Genworth.
  • Luxury goods. Coach is now nearly 60% below its all-time high, and Fossil is 56.5% below its all-time high. Michael Kors is nearly half its 52-week high.
  • Railroads. Union Pacific, CSX, and Kansas City Southern are all at least 20% below their 52-week highs.

The two biggest areas that are getting clobbered are energy and technology stocks. The problems in energy are obvious: Oil is down more than 50% from its recent highs.

The problems in tech are not quite as clear, although the weakness in the Chinese market seems to be the easiest answer. But some tech stocks seem tempting at these levels: Intel sells for just 11.3 times expected earnings, and pays a 3.4% dividend, to boot. Applied Materials sells for 12.3 times expected earnings and yields 2.5%. And Sandisk sells for 12 times forward earnings and yields 2.3%. If you have the cash — and the tolerance for tech stocks — these might good places to nibble.

Firing up the Grandpa box

New technology companies look at dividends the way kids look at their grandfathers’ ear hair: Just plain nasty. Who needs dividends when you’ve got growth, and plenty of shiny new things to invest in?

daveBut after tech companies reach a certain age — if they reach a certain age — they warm up to dividends. Dividends, after all, reward shareholders and executives alike. (And, for long-term stockholders, dividends have the same tax treatment as capital gains). And paying dividends is considered a Nice Thing To Do when you have more cash than you know what to do with.

Currently, 10 tech companies with four-star or better ratings from Standard & Poor’s have dividend yields higher than 2%, which is higher than the average stock in the S&P 500 index. The average yield: 2.73%.

That’s the good news. The bad news, more or less, is that these companies have lost an average 9.27% this year, even with dividends reinvested. Biggest loser: The identity-challenged Hewlett-Packard (HPQ), down 20.2%. Biggest gainer: Microchip Technology (MCHP), up 7.1%.

On the other hand, these are about the cheapest tech stocks you’ll find, and you get paid to wait for them to return to Wall Street’s favor. Intel, for example, trades for 12.7 times its estimated earnings. HP trades for a measly 8.2 times estimated earnings.

Bear in mind that in technology, things can always get worse. But generally speaking, it’s better to buy cheap than dear, and a dividend never hurts, whippersnappers. The 10 tech dividend stars:

  • CA (ticker: CA), 3.36% dividend yield.
  • Intel (INTC), 3.06%
  • Microchip Technology (MCHP), 3%
  • Cisco Systems (CSCO), 2.95%
  • Qualcomm (QCOM), 2.88%
  • Symantec (SYMC), 2.56%
  • Xerox (XRX), 2.53%
  • Corning (GLW), 2.36%
  • Motorola Solutions (MSI), 2.35%
  • Hewlett Packard (HPQ), 2.22%