Off balance?

Three years ago on this blog, I introduced the Amish Portfolio — essentially a bare-bones, low-cost portfolio for those who get a little buggy by complex investment recommendations. If you have a wood-burning computer to track it, all the better.

The portfolio consists of three funds:

* Vanguard Total World Stock Index fund (ticker: VTWSX). The beauty of this fund is that you don’t have to fret about how much to have in international stocks and how much to keep at home. It’s all in there, according to market capitalization: 56.5% North America, 21.5% Europe, 20.8% Asia, and 8.0% emerging markets. Cost for the investor shares: 0.19% a year, or $1.90 per $1,000 invested.

* Vanguard Total Bond Index fund (VBMFX). You get broad exposure most types of U.S. bonds. Current yield: 2.54%. Cost: 0.15%, or $1.50 per $1,000.

* Vanguard Prime Money Market (VMMXX). Hey, it’s a money fund. It yields 2.03% after its 0.16% expenses.

The suggestion for conservative investors: 20% Vanguard Total Bond, 20% Vanguard Prime Money Market and 60% Vanguard Total World stock. You can add to stocks (and reduce cash or bonds) depending on your personal risk profile.

A mix of stocks, bonds and money market funds is remarkably self-balancing: Despite the stock market’s runup, the conservative blend above is at 65% stocks, 18% bonds and 18% money market funds. It probably doesn’t need to be rebalanced now.

Had this been your portfolio for the past five years, however, you’d now be 76% in stocks — far more than your initial target. In this case, you’d want to sell enough from your stock fund and add to your money fund and bond fund to get to your original 60% stocks, 20% bonds, 20% money fund allocation.

Rebalancing too frequently means that you’ll be cutting off your gains too quickly. (In a taxable account, it means you could be triggering taxes, too). Using the 10% rule typically means occasional rebalancing, and often when one market — stocks or bonds — are a bit frothy. If you’ve been in the market for a while, and you have a set allocation to stocks, now might be the time to rebalance.

 

 

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