A blue chip by any other name

When it comes to mutual fund marketing, the glass is never half empty: It’s always full. This is why we don’t see funds with names like “The Occasional Outperformance Growth Fund” or “The Somewhat Erratic Income Fund.”

We do, however, have several funds with the words “blue chip” in them. Unfortunately, they may not have the blue-chip attributes you’re looking for.

First of all: What’s a blue-chip stock? The term “blue chip” comes from poker, where blue chips are traditionally the most valuable. “I think of it as a large-cap company that has been around for decades, pays an attractive yield and has an above-average record of raising earnings and dividends for an extended period of time,” said Sam Stovall, chief investment strategist of U.S. Equity Strategy at CFRA. It’s a fairly exalted status that few stocks earn, and fewer keep.  They’re the kind of stocks you’d imagine Uncle Pennybags from Monopoly would buy.

The term “blue chip” has become so popular that there are 15 stock funds with “blue chip” in the Morningstar database. Elizabeth Laprade, research analyst at  Adviser Investments, notes that three of the largest blue-chip funds – T. Rowe Price Blue Chip Growth ($54 billion), Fidelity Blue Chip Growth ($25 billion) and John Hancock Blue Chip Growth ($3 billion) – have between 122 and 429 stocks.

Whether there are 429 or even 122 blue-chip stocks is debatable, at best, and all three funds seem to stretch the definition. T. Rowe Price Blue Chip Growth, for example, has stakes in true blue-chip companies like Boeing and JPMorgan Chase. But its third-largest holding is Tencent Holdings, the Chinese internet advertising company. It also had stakes in Tesla, Monster Beverage and Norwegian Cruise Lines, which are probably not blue-chip companies, at least by Mr. Stovall’s definition.  All three funds own Alibaba.

Distressingly, all three funds have more volatility than the Standard & Poor’s 500 and lower dividend yields, too. This may be because all three are growth funds, and growth stocks often sneer at the notion of dividends. It may also be because of the funds’ expense ratios, which range from -0.78% for the John Hancock fund and O.69% for the Fidelity offering. Those aren’t excessive by large-company growth fund standards, but they do take a bite out of the funds’ dividend payouts.

Even worse is the funds’ maximum drawdown – the most the funds lost from peak to trough during downturns in the past five years. Here again, they didn’t beat the S&P 500, Ms. Laprade notes. “People need to be careful,” she said. “If they’re looking for blue-chip stocks, that may not be the case.”

 

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