In which matters become more serious

Because I was born during the Taft administration, I remember that 1987 was a very, very good year in the market, at least at first. And I remember an editor, who shall remain nameless, saying, excitedly, “Isn’t it amazing how well this market is doing in the face of rising interest rates?”

The Dow Jones industrial average had climbed 27.6% in the first six months of the year, and tacked on another 7% in July 1987. And, in fact, the yield on the 10-year Treasury note had risen from 7.08% to 8.62% from the first of the year to the end of July.

From there on out, however, interest rates rose steadily, topping 10% on October 16, 1987. And the stock market, like Wile E. Coyote walking off a cliff, suddenly noticed that interest rates were rising. From its peak of 2,722 on August 25, the Dow began to stumble — first slowly, and then more rapidly. On October 15, the Dow fell 2.4%. The next day, it fell 4.6%. The next trading day, it plunged 508 points, or 22.6%, a record one-day drop.

For the past 12 months, the yield on the 10-year T-note has been creeping higher, albeit at far lower levels than 1987. (It’s still hard for me to get too worked up over a 2.84% T-note yield.) And the stock market has been soaring higher. Last year was, in fact, a very good year, with the S&P rising 22%. Even after today’s 666-point carnage (a 2.54% drop) the Dow is still up 3.3% for the year.

It’s entirely likely that interest rates will continue to rise. To quote myself: “The average yield for the three-year T-bill since 1934 is 3.5%. If we want to get rid of the very highest and very lowest yields, we get a typical yield of 3.18% over that 83-year period.” We’re closer to the average 10-year yield than we were, but we’re still a ways off. And being at the average rate of interest isn’t usually a problem for the stock market.

What is a problem is that stocks are generally overvalued. Rising rates only make that worse: Bonds and bank CDs suddenly become more attractive than they were previously. Corporate borrowng becomes more expensive. And, if rates are indeed rising because of a strong economy, higher wages will weigh on future earnings. Events must unfold to perfection at this level of stock prices, relative to earnings. And, as Wile E. Coyote could tell you, things rarely unfold to perfection.

If you’re a long-term investor, you’ll probably do better than 2.84% a year the next decade if you’re in stocks. What you probably won’t get is high returns with low volatility. If the bull market has pushed your stock allocation significantly above your target, it’s time to rebalance your portfolio back to your target. Otherwise, hang on and hope for the best, and keep saving — which is, after all, the single most imporant determinant of how much money you have when you reach your goal.

 

 

 

 

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