Awash in cash

People who like dividend stocks might find that technology stocks are the type of stocks that they like.

For one thing, they have enough cash to buy several small European countries. “Companies have enough money to do whatever they want, and that’s before potential reparations” from the tax bill, noted Howard Silverblatt, senior index analyst for S&P Dow Jones Indexes. And how. All told, about $1.8 trillion is cooling its heels on corporate balance sheets, and much of that is on tech balance sheets. Here are the 10 companies with the biggest cash stashes:

Apple has another $195 billion in “long term investments” on its balance sheet, which skeptics might label as “pretty darn close to cash.”  And overall, IT is the second-largest dividend payer, behind financials.

Why does IT have so much cash, aside from being immensely profitable? One reason might be that IT went through a near-death experience in 2000-2002, and they have learned the lesson that cash is your best friend in hard times. (Banks, which have gone through several near-death in the past 50 years, never seem to learn that).

Another is that IT companies rely on innovation to survive, and innovation doesn’t come cheap. Either you have to hire top people (and pay them well to keep them) or you have to pay up to buy innovative companies. That requires cash, too, although having an extravagantly valued stock price is good, too.

What’s interesting is that many of these stocks aren’t insanely priced. Apple sells for 14.4 times its estimated 12 months’ earnings, and pays a 1.45% dividend, too. Cisco sells for 14.4 times earnings and pays a 3.0% dividend. Oracle pays a 1.48% dividend and sells for 15.3 times earnings. Only Facebook, which sells at 26.8 times its expected earnings (and doesn’t pay no stinking dividend) fits the profile of the gunslinging tech company of yore.

(The two biotech companies in the chart, Amgen and Gilead, also rely on heaps of cash to continue innovation, are cheap, and pay good dividends. Coca-Cola is, well, Coca-Cola).

During the 2007-2009 bear market, and for some time thereafter, technology was the sector with the highest dividends, precisely because it had the cash on hand to do so. Banks were too busy staving off bankruptcy. For investors who like dividends and dislike bankruptcy, large-cap IT seems to be a reasonable bet.

Naturally, there’s an ETF for that: The First Trust NASDAQ Technology Dividend Index Fund (TDIV), which currently yields 2.14% on a trailing basis. The fund doesn’t have the sizzling returns that an all-tech fund has — it’s up a mere 21% this year, vs. 36% for the technology sector — but that’s not why you buy a dividend fund. Assuming these companies don’t waste their money on something foolish, like buying several European countries, they could be a good long-term investment for dividend investors.

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